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A Day in the Internet
Created by Online Education

Yes you can activate a clean install of Windows 7 with an upgrade product key

I am not promoting piracy, but I ran into a nasty little problem when I tried to activate Windows 7 on my home computer.  Maybe this post will help others like me who can’t get help anywhere else. 

In anticipation of obtaining my Windows 7 Pro upgrades (which I ordered in July on the pre-order 50% off sale) I installed Windows 7 Pro using a clean install without entering a product key for activation on two of my computers.  My laptop and my main home computer.  Both computers were clean installs on either a new hard drive or a new partition.  On my laptop I resized my partitions and installed Windows 7 on a new partition separate from Windows Vista.  So now its in a dual boot configuration with Windows Vista and Windows 7. 

On Thursday, I got my upgrade product keys from the Microsoft store and went to activate my computers.  On my laptop the activation was successful wtihout a problem.  Then I went to activate my home computer and got the error telling me that I can’t use an upgrade product key to activate a clean install of Windows 7.  So now I am left with a fully loaded PC running Windows 7 with only 10 days left to activate before I either have to re-arm or enter a new product key.  It takes hours to backup and restore the data on this PC, its my wife’s main computer and we have tons of stuff to backup and move around.  I’d pay a fee to avoid having to do this! 

The home computer was running Widnows Vista 32-bit Home premium edition.  It got upgraded to Windows 7 Pro 64-bit using a clean install method.  A while after I had installed Windows 7, I decided to cleanup the old hard drive that had the Windows Vista install on it because I wouldn’t need it anymore.  So I can’t even go back to Vista without having to do a clean install of Vista first which is something I want to avoid.  But from my understanding you can’t upgrade a 32-bit OS to the 64-bit version, so I have to do a clean install anyway.  But now that I’ve wiped out the hard drive that had Vista on it, so the activation wizard can’t see the old OS and won’t let me use my upgrade key.  I heard hints in various forums that the activation wizard looks for partitions with an upgradable OS on it. 

On my laptop, I still have the partition with Activated Windows Vista home premium 64-bit because of the dual boot setup, so I think thats why the activation wizard let me activate my laptop without a problem.  So what can we do in a situation like this?  Call Microsoft, take a huge risk and investigate non legit options?  

I had thought about trying to run the Retail upgrade install of Windows 7 on my home PC and use my upgrade key for activation.  The reason I had hope that this might work is because my home PC was loaded using the RTM Windows 7, and the download I got from Microsoft was the official retail media, so there is a very small chance it may have let me do another upgrade using my upgrade key and then possibly activate successfully.  My other thought was to install windows Vista on a spare hard drive and just leave it in my PC when booted up to Windows 7 and see if the Windows 7 Activation wizard will recognize a valid copy of Windows Vista and let me activate using my upgrade key. 

I was getting desperate since it could easily take two days to reload my home computer and go through all the trouble to get Windows 7 running again!  This is such a pain!  It shouldn’t be this hard for legit customers to use Microsoft software!!!

Ok, now that the rant is over, let me tell you how to get around this problem and get your Windows 7 systems activated.  This is actually very easy and only took a few minutes.  To my knowledge there is nothing underhanded or risky about this procedure.  Its also not well documented, it took me two days of google research and massive searches to find the information that helped me. 

Thanks to Winsupersite.com community for this information!

After performing the clean install, ensure that there are no Windows Updates pending that would require a system reboot. (You’ll see an orange shield icon next to Shutdown in the Start Menu if this is the case).  Install the updates and reboot if necessary before proceeding.

Then, open regedit.exe with Start Menu Search and navigate to:

HKLM/Software/Microsoft/Windows/CurrentVersion/Setup/OOBE/

Change MediaBootInstall from “1” to “0”.

Open the Start Menu again and type cmd to display a shortcut to the Command Line utility. Right-click this shortcut and choose “Run as administrator.” Handle the UAC prompt.

In the command line window, type: slmgr /rearm

Then click OK, close the command line window and reboot. When Windows 7 reboots, run the Activate Windows wizard (go to system properties and click the activate windows link at the bottom of the window), type in your upgrade product key and activate windows.  It should activate successfully and you are now finished!  Congratulations on saving yourself hours (or days in my case) of wasted time jumping through hoops trying to get your genuine Windows 7 installation activated!

Exchange 2003/2007, IIS 6 Metabase and SMTP domains

   Recently I ran into a very strange issue with Exchange 2003, IIS 6 and SMTP domains.  The environment is a mixed Exchange 2003/2007 site with about 10 public SMTP domain names for which this Exchange org is responsible for.  Since the beginning of my time as the Administrator for this system the recipient policy settings have been the same.  All the SMTP domains are listed in the recipient policy but some are unchecked.  For years this has been the case and we’ve never had a problem.  But something must have happened recently, because the last few days have been busy for me trying to figure out what was causing a mail delivery issue that resulted in all incoming mail for several of the legitimate public SMTP domains to bounce back to the sender.

   After some research and manual testing to try to identify what was causing the problem, I found a strange thing.  In the IIS 6 metabase on one of the Exchange 2003 servers, the public SMTP domains were missing from the “domains” key under LMSMTPSVC1DOMAIN.  Two of our domains were listed but all the rest were missing.  If the domains are not listed in the IIS metabase for SMTP, the server will reject mail sent to those domains because it doesn’t realize that its responsible for receiving mail for them.  So I decided to do a test, I opened up the recipient policy and put a check next to all public SMTP domains and waited a minute before refreshing the IIS metabase information.  When I checked again, I found all the public SMTP domains were correctly listed in the IIS metabase now. 

   Earlier in the day I was trying to send test messages via telnet through SMTP.  When I would try to send a test message to a user on one of the affected domains I would get the error “unable to relay for user@domain.com”.  After refreshing the IIS 6 metabase, my telnet test messages were being accepted successfully and I confirmed that the user was receiving them.  Again, the recipient policies have been the same since the beginning of the AD in this site.  I have no idea why all of a sudden we would see incoming mail problems.  I can only speculate what might have happened, perhaps a quirk due to an unexpected DC shutdown, or maybe its some weird fluke with IIS 6 and some other third party apps that have SMTP event hooks that caused it.  I really have no idea and I don’t have a screenshot of the IIS 6 metabase config from before the time when we started to have problems. 

   What fixed the problem was to make sure all the public SMTP domains appeared in the IIS 6 metabase.  After that was taken care of, mail delivery issues were fixed and I was able to verify this using manual telnet test messages.  So I know what the problem was and I know what fixed it, I just don’t know what actually caused the problem in the first place. 

   If you don’t have a metabase explorer, you can use the one included in the IIS 6 resource kit, which is available as a download from Microsoft.

Migrating to Windows 7

Yesterday, I upgraded my work PC to Windows 7 professional.  I wanted to give the upgrade a try and see how it would go, but normally I prefer to do clean installs.  The upgrade process took about 2-3 hours but did retain all my applications and most settings.  I did have to remove some HP software that came with the PC, but overall it wasn’t too bad.  I had some additional trouble with Ultramon that caused some errors and weird behavior with the taskbar.  Here are some observations so far:

1. The taskbar is taller and takes up more screen real estate.  This isn’t necessarily bad, but takes some getting used to.  It makes the icons look smaller. 
2.  The quick launch bar has been transformed into something different, mabye better, not sure yet.  I was dismayed to find out that the upgrade had wiped out my quick launch folder completely, all my pre-arranged shortcuts were just gone!  I found a way to work around this by creating a new quick launch folder manually and moving shortcuts that I wanted in the list.  I wish I had backed up my quick launch folder before the upgrade! 
3. The transparency is nice, but at times a little weird.  Since the top inch or so of many apps is now transparent, it seems like your apps are not maximized or as if there is a big gap at the top of the screen. 
4.  I think its cute how the new network connection icon in the task bar looks like it has a pitch fork in it.  🙂
5.  I like the new start menu, specifically the ability to expand options for programs such as RDP.  Now when you go to RDP in the start menu, it gives you an expandable list of recent connections, which I think is nice, even though I use mRemote to organize my RDP connections.  
6. Performance seems good, the PC boots up pretty fast especially considering it was an upgrade install. 

The official upgrades for my home computers will be available in a few weeks, so I’ll post back later on with more observations.

Switching from Windows Mobile to the iPhone 3GS

Last week I upgraded my cell phone from an HTC Tilt running Windows mobile 6.1 (custom cooked Rom) to the 32GB iPhone 3GS.  I wen to the at&t store on Dale Mabry and Henderson and was surprised at how nice of a store it was.  I had no lines and no waiting and was able to get in and out with my upgrade in about 10 minutes. 

So now that I’ve had my new iPhone for  a week now, here are some thoughts and notes about my switch…

Things I miss from Windows Mobile:
   1. The ability to control the volume for PDA sounds and the ringer separately.  At night I used to mute the PDA sounds and leave the phone ringer on maybe 2 bars.  This worked out great for me as I’m on call 24/7, so witching my phone to silent or even putting it on vibrate is not a great option for me.  Maybe one day this will be available as a feature on the iPhone.

   2. Easier file management.  I miss being able to just connect my phone to my PC and copy files back and forth via windows explorer.  Having to use iTunes to simply put files on my phone is a bit of a pain, epsecially when I’m not around my home computer and want to copy something to my iPhone.  I know there are 3rd party apps out there to help with this, but the lack of built in file management is a bit of a pain.  Not to mention that much more limited range of file types you can actually use on the iPhone.

What I love about the iPhone:
   1. The interface!  Its easy to use, visually appealing, clean and responsive.  Windows Mobile can be a bit slow at times and more complicated to navigate through screens and various settings. 
   2. It just works, right out of the box I was able to connect it to my bluetooth radio in my car for hands free calling.  I didn’t have to run through any setup wizard to align my screen or anything like that.  It just worked. 
   3. Easier to get apps!  There are many apps for windows mobile, but you have to go hunting for them, and most of the good ones cost money!  The iTunes app store has many apps available and a good number of them are free, some good ones too!  I love being able to tap “install” and it just goes to work and then you can open the app and begin using it.  

Some problems with the iPhone:
   1. The mail client lacks the enterprise grade functionality and reliability that I’ve come to get used to with Windows Mobile.  I’ve tried different types of mail accounts (activesync and MAPI, etc), and I’ve seen inconsistent behavior with the push functionality.  For example, I have an Exchange account setup and sometimes I’ll notice an hour delay in getting notified of new mail.  I can be on either 3G or wifi and it still happens.  Its just not as reliable for instant e-mail notifications. 

   2. I really really wish I could control PDA sound volume (email alerts, notifications, etc) separately from the phone ringer.  This is huge for me! 

Overall, I love my new iPhone.  Its awesome to have my mobile phone and my iPod all in one device.  It works great with other technologies I employ in my daily life.  Some people get a little uptight about losing some enterprise business features or reliability on the iPhone, but thats not really the target audience anyway.  And really, most post people are not going to care if they can’t edit Microsoft Office documents on their iPhone, they just want to be able to read and reply to e-mails on the go and are completely happy to do the PC work on the PC and just enjoy the iPhone for what it is.

The movie Bolt and Even Almighty

The family and I were watching the movie “Evan Almighty” tonight and noticed that the chief of staff in for “Evan Baxter” could have been a real life version of “The Agent” in the movie  “Bolt“.  This dude looks the same and talks the same and everything, it was very obvious right off, and I wouldn’t be surprised if the “Bolt” character was modeled after the real actor in the movie “Evan Almighty”.  The actor who did the voice of “The Agent” in “Bolt” is named “Greg Germann“.  The actor who played in “Evan Almighty” is named “John Michael Higgins“.  Compare them side by side, and the resemblances are amazing!

Have to click user icon to unlock Windows Vista

Something happened to my Windows Vista desktop that I use primarily at work.  To explain the issue, here is some background information.  I normally lock my computer anytime I step away from it to prevent un-authorized access.  It used to be that I could just hit CTRL+ALT+DEL and type in my password and press (Return|Enter) to unlock my machine.  However, in the last week or so instead of bringing up the password field for the logged on user when you hit CTR+ALT+DEL, what you get instead is an icon for the username which you then have to click or just hit enter before you type in the password.  Now this may not sound like much of a problem, but when you are used to something happening a certain way, changing that makes a difference.  I didn’t change any of my user options in Vista, so I am guessing that this is a change from a recent update or something from Microsoft.  I don’t have access to many Vista machine to test this on, but I am curious if anyone else has seen this before and if you know how to fix it.  If I find a solution I will post it here, but for now I am still looking.  I just want to hit CTRL+ALT+DEL and type in my password to logon, I don’t want to have to click on my user icon or have an extra key press before I can put in my password.  Maybe thats just me being set in my ways…

Add recipients of sent items to the Outlook auto fill cache

This is a great utility (also free) that will allow you to add the recipients of your sent items to the Outlook auto fill cache.  This is great if you reload a PC or in any number of other solutions.  Click here to read more about it and download this great utility.

Outlook auto fill list management

Here is a great little tool from NirSoft that allows you to edit, backup and manage your Outlook auto fille cache file or .n2k file.  This is great for backup or combing through to fix a corrupt or otherwise incorrect entry without having to scroll through the list in Outlook.  Click Here to read more about it and download this completely free tool. 

Bizzare issue without outbound faxing through e-mail and Public folders

I recently ran into some very strange issues with an older fax through e-mail solution.  The setup is a mixed Exchange 5.5 (unsupported) and Exchange 2003 site with an old version of RightFax from Captaris (version 8.5 – unsuppored).  After years of working in this configuration, suddenly the outbound fax abilities quit working and you would receive NDR messages anytime you sent an outbound fax.  Incoming was working without problems, only outbound fax through e-mail was a problem.  I checked the Exchange connector for RightFax on the Exchange 5.5 box which was fine, there were some side issues there where some .tmp files weren’t getting purged properly, but I couldn’t find a cause for the issue we were having.  Reboots were done in hopes this would help resolve the issue, but they did not help.  The only errors I was receiving were as follows:

Exchange cannot determine a route for this message or no next hop can be determined.   A routing group topology does not have a routing group connector set up between the routing groups.  Mail destined to a routing group that does not have a routing group connector to connect it to other groups cannot be sent.   

Solution: Add or configure your RGC between RGs

 

and

 

The domain ‘$MSGWIA$.FAX.*’ is unreachable.

 

No route was found for the recipient server.  Please contact your system administrator.
            <servername.domain.private #5.4.4>

After a few days of researching and trying to find a solution to this issue, I happen to notice that I had another problem.  In the Exchange 2003 ESM I could not browse the public folder tree.  I’ve had this issue before and seen various things cause it, so I began researching the exact error codes I received.  (sorry I didn’t write those down, but they said something like “503 service unavailable” when I tried through OWA). 

I ended up restarting the Exchange 2003 HTTP Virtual server from ESM, and also dismounting and re-mounting the public folder store.  After I did that I noticed some events in my application log basically saying the route for FAX was online and mentioned our fax server name.  Out of curiosity I tried sending an outbound fax through e-mail and it worked!  I then asked the staff in the location where the issue was originally reported to try sending some test faxes through e-mail but they reported back and said it was still not working.  I then performed the same steps I mentioned above on all Exchange 2003 servers which seemed to fix the issue of not being able to view the public folder tree in ESM, but also had the side effect of fixing the outbound fax issue. 

I have no idea how an old fax system could possibly be tied into the public folder system of Exchange 2003.  I have no support for either Exchange 5.5 or the version of RightFax we are using, so I will probably never know.  I do know that the two issues were related somehow and the same solution for fixing the public folder tree view in ESM also fixed our outbound fax issues.  I think this is very strange but am glad the system is working again.  I hope this will not delay replacing these old systems and they still need to be replaced asap.